Wednesday, April 19, 2017

The 'Gospel' Coalition Celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. and Black Liberation Theology

The "Gospel" Coalition and ERCL is presenting MLK 50 Conference. This focuses on the man as well as promoting the typical liberal mantra of white Christian racism as well as Black Liberation theology. The list of speakers include Russell Moore,  John Piper, Don Carson, and Matt Chandler. Matt Chandler, Thabiti Anyabwile,Russell Moore,Don Carson, and Ronny Flyod sin on the Board sit on the MLK50 Board of Advisors.

The stated purpose of this conference:"Racial unity is a gospel issue and all the more urgent 50 years after Martin Luther King Jr.’s death....The 50th anniversary of King’s tragic death marks an opportunity for Christians to reflect on the state of racial unity in the church and the culture. It creates the occasion to reflect on where Christians have been and look ahead to where we must go as we pursue racial unity in the midst of tremendous tension."


The problem not only is the Marxist Black Liberation Theology, but also that MLK was not a Christian. Public papers by MLK are here.


Basically, MLK denied Jesus' deity, His resurrection, a literal interpretation of Scripture, and a time he he realized he was a sinner in need of salvation by Christ Jesus alone apart from any works of his own (conversion).


In his own words, MLK said of Jesus Christ and the issue of His "divinity":

"Where then can we in the liberal tradition find the divine dimension in Jesus? We may find the divinity of Christ not in his substantial unity with God, but in his filial consciousness and in his unique dependence upon God. It was his felling of absolute dependence on God, as Schleiermaker would say, that made him divine. Yes it was the warmnest of his devotion to God and the intimatcy of his trust in God that accounts for his being the supreme revelation of God. All of this reveals to us that one man has at last realized his true divine calling: That of becoming a true son of man by becoming a true son of God. It is the achievement of a man who has, as nearly as we can tell, completely opened his life to the influence of the divine spirit.

The orthodox attempt to explain the divinity of Jesus in terms of an inherent metaphysical substance within him seems to me quite inadaquate. To say that the Christ, whose example of living we are bid to follow, is divine in an ontological sense is actually harmful and detrimental. To invest this Christ with such supernatural qualities makes the rejoinder: "Oh, well, he had a better chance for that kind of life than we can possible have." In other words, one could easily use this as a means to hide behind behind his failures. So that the orthodox view of the divinity of Christ is in my mind quite readily denied. The true significance of the divinity of Christ lies in the fact that his achievement is prophetic and promissory for every other true son of man who is willing to submit his will to the will and spirit og [sic]God. Christ was to be only the prototype of one among many brothers....

This divine quality or this unity with God was not something thrust upon Jesus from above, but it was a definite achievement through the process of moral struggle and self-abnegation. " End quote.

Scripture however, is very clear to state that Jesus is God. He also exercised omniscience, contrary to what MLK claimed.

Joh 1:1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. Joh 1:2 He was in the beginning with God. Joh 1:3 All things came into being through Him, and apart from Him nothing came into being that has come into being.

Joh 1:14  And the Word became flesh, and dwelt among us, and we saw His glory, glory as of the only begotten from the Father, full of grace and truth. 

Joh 8:24 "Therefore I said to you that you will die in your sins; for unless you believe that I am He, you will die in your sins."

Joh 8:56 "Your father Abraham rejoiced to see My day, and he saw it and was glad." Joh 8:57 So the Jews said to Him, "You are not yet fifty years old, and have You seen Abraham?" Joh 8:58 Jesus said to them, "Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was born, I am."

And as for His omniscience:

Joh 1:48 Nathanael *said to Him, "How do You know me?" Jesus answered and said to him, "Before Philip called you, when you were under the fig tree, I saw you."

Luk 11:17 But He knew their thoughts and said to them, "Any kingdom divided against itself is laid waste; and a house divided against itself falls.

Mat 17:24 When they came to Capernaum, those who collected the two-drachma tax came to Peter and said, "Does your teacher not pay the two-drachma tax?" Mat 17:25 He *said, "Yes." And when he came into the house, Jesus spoke to him first, saying, "What do you think, Simon? From whom do the kings of the earth collect customs or poll-tax, from their sons or from strangers?"


The denial of the true Jesus by King Jr. has hints of Mormonism (Jesus was a man who achieve divinity) and New Age ("metaphysical" "consciousness").

So why would Evangelicals celebrate a true anti-Christ like MLK?

Here are some helpful quotes from Anthony Bradley's article "The Marxist roots of black liberation theology":



James Cone, the chief architect of black liberation theology in his book A Black Theology of Liberation (1970), develops black theology as a system. In this new formulation, Christian theology is a theology of liberation – "a rational study of the being of God in the world in light of the existential situation of an oppressed community, relating the forces of liberation to the essence of the Gospel, which is Jesus Christ," writes Cone. Black consciousness and the black experience of oppression orient black liberation theology – i.e., one of victimization from white oppression....
One of the tasks of black theology, says Cone, is to analyze the nature of the Gospel of Jesus Christ in light of the experience of oppressed blacks. For Cone, no theology is Christian theology unless it arises from oppressed communities and interprets Jesus' work as that of liberation. Christian theology is understood in terms of systemic and structural relationships between two main groups: victims (the oppressed) and victimizers (oppressors). In Cone's context, writing in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the great event of Christ's liberation was freeing African Americans from the centuries-old tyranny of white racism and white oppression....
For black liberation theologians, Sunday is uniquely tied to redefining their sense of being human within a context of marginalization. "Black people who have been humiliated and oppressed by the structures of white society six days of the week gather together each Sunday morning in order to experience another definition of their humanity," says James Cone in his book Speaking the Truth (1999)....
Black liberation theologians James Cone and Cornel West have worked diligently to embed Marxist thought into the black church since the 1970s. For Cone, Marxism best addressed remedies to the condition of blacks as victims of white oppression. In For My People, Cone explains that "the Christian faith does not possess in its nature the means for analyzing the structure of capitalism. Marxism as a tool of social analysis can disclose the gap between appearance and reality, and thereby help Christians to see how things really are."
End quote.
Col 2:2  that their hearts may be encouraged, having been knit together in love, and attaining to all the wealth that comes from the full assurance of understanding, resulting in a true knowledge of God's mystery, that is, Christ Himself, 3  in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge. 4  I say this so that no one will delude you with persuasive argument.
1Co 1:21  For since in the wisdom of God the world through its wisdom did not come to know God, God was well-pleased through the foolishness of the message preached to save those who believe. 
1Co 2:4  and my message and my preaching were not in persuasive words of wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power, 
1Co 2:5  so that your faith would not rest on the wisdom of men, but on the power of God. 
1Co 2:6  Yet we do speak wisdom among those who are mature; a wisdom, however, not of this age nor of the rulers of this age, who are passing away; 

1Co 2:13  which things we also speak, not in words taught by human wisdom, but in those taught by the Spirit, combining spiritual thoughts with spiritual words. 14  But a natural man does not accept the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness to him; and he cannot understand them, because they are spiritually appraised.
Eph 4:17  So this I say, and affirm together with the Lord, that you walk no longer just as the Gentiles also walk, in the futility of their mind, 18  being darkened in their understanding, excluded from the life of God because of the ignorance that is in them, because of the hardness of their heart; 19  and they, having become callous, have given themselves over to sensuality for the practice of every kind of impurity with greediness. 20  But you did not learn Christ in this way, 21  if indeed you have heard Him and have been taught in Him, just as truth is in Jesus, 

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